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in washington. the writing has appeared in "the new york times," "politico," foreign policy and washington monthly among others. they came to us last night from virginia, took a late night train and what i'd like to do is turn it over to you for your thoughts and comments to start off. >> thank you very much. i'm going to start for us today. let me thank you much for hosting us to thank you for coming. it's an honor pleasure and we look forward to nature scene discussion today. i'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islamic republic of iran". the first of these means, and these two get at the heart of our book. the united states is today enhanced and for the past two years a power and relative decline in the middle east. the second core team as the biggest beneficiary of american ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative position of the united states and the islamic republic o
. >> that's only if you think 80,000 people dead is not ugly. yes, sir. adding a mac >> foreign-policy and especially security systems. this is another area where congress really has a role to play. the administration is basically decided that mohamed morsi at egypt is the new mubarak. the guy in the seat we will now help. it's completely indifferent to what our aid program should look like and what the desired outcome and egypt should be. the only thing they appear to be interested in is the continuation of the israeli egyptian camp david accords, which are obviously of great interest, but not really the only thing they should animate us and we talk about the largest country in the middle east. when i thought we were delivering fighter jets to the egyptian military, i just asked myself, what message does this send? the rule should be not the foreign aid is bad and not that foreign aid is good and not that military assistance is good or bad, it is the u.s. taxpayer dollar used to further u.s. tax your interest and every time a new government comes into power, we should take that aid do
, there seem to be two approaches to foreign policy in the twenty-first century. one of the neo conservatives which have great power in this administration. check name names which i will not do. >> i do in this book. >> the new conservative ideological approach to foreign policy seems to be prevalent now as opposed to the traditional national interest pragmatic approach or is there some other approach? what do you see in the twenty-first century? >> i see a policy regardless who the president is of clear national interest and a policy must be for any nation whether it is the russians or the chinese, all nations, all individuals respond in their own self-interest, nothing wrong with that. that is predictable. the policy of our country, foreign policy, all the instruments of power it that you use to frame a policy must be driven with some higher purpose. i mentioned purpose, we lost purpose. we have been about ricocheting crisis to crisis. there's no strategic thinking, hasn't been strategic thinking for a long time in our foreign policy. it is the point i keep making. so does dick lugar who is
on this complex issue. robert kagn is a center fellow of the united states and european foreign policy of the brookings institution. his most recent book "the world america made" has been published and dr. kagan also serves as a member of secretary clinton's foreign policy board soon to be senator kerry's policy board and writes a monthly column on a world affairs from "the washington post" and the weekly standard and the new republic. joshua landis is the director of the center for middle east studies and this is the professor at the university of oklahoma. he writes a daily newsletter on syrian policy that attract some 200,000 pages a month. is really one of the most thoughtful blogs today on a which really dives into the crisis and syria. current the vice president for the new initiatives and the distinguished scholar at the woodrow wilson institute at national center for scholars in washington, d.c. they can have another great president. for nearly to nearly two decades has served the secretaries of state and advisers in the middle east bureau, negotiating middle east peace which w
's foreign policy aide related for diplomacy and our presence throughout the world. if you let back -- look back to congress 20, 25 years ago, is essentially made up of people who have the relationship to world war ii and its aftermath in terms of the u.s. global engagement. the marshall plan and the rebuilding of japan in america's prisons. in the relationship also in the lessons and threat posed by the cold war. and those were very defining, major umbrella issues that produced great statesman. henry jackson and others on a bipartisan bill and water's edge, america's presence and engagement around the world. two superpowers, the umbrella that was held over the world stifled the regional and local factions and tensions that erupted after the end of the cold war. that all had a significant impact on the american people and commitment and support for the u.s. to be at bobo -- be globally engaged. it is the possibility of a five alarm fire and everybody's been to try to keep them from getting out of control. with the fall of the wall in the aftermath, there was the defining event and that was
has made haiti one of the top foreign policy projects, helping the impoverished island build back better after the devastating earthquake that killed over a quarter million people. in no small measure has her husband -- president clinton -- been a part of that attempt at restoration of haiti from that devastating earthquake. last week during secretary clinton's final appearance before the senate foreign relations committee, she said -- and i quote -- "every time that blue and white airplane carrying the words "united states of america" touches down in some far-off capital, i feel again the honor it is to represent the world's indispensable nation. madam secretary, you have truly honored us with your indispensable leadership. and on behalf of all of our senate colleagues, we want to thank you for your extraordinary service to this country. and i want to say that your position will be in capable hands with our colleague and your former colleague, senator john kerry, who will serve as we confirm him in the next 24 hours as the 68th secretary of state. senator kerry has served in this
may approach foreign policy and national security in his second term. and in a little less than an hour and a half, a cato institute forum on the state of libertarianism. >> several live events to tell you about today. the georgetown university law center hosts a forum with campaign staff members and representatives of interest groups who will focus on how lessons of last year's campaign will affect legislation in the new congress. that's on c-span at 11 a.m. eastern. and here on c-span2 at 1 p.m., we're covering an atlantic council discussion on the situation in mali. >> john mccain's 2000 campaign when he ran for president is the most memorable campaign. i mean, of any that i've ever covered or been around. i mean, it was just -- we'll never, we'll never see it again. i mean, here he was, you know, facing george w. bush who had all the face cards of the republican party backing him, and the three republican governors in new hampshire and all the money, and john mccain went out and held 114 town meetings, and he stayed there until every or question was answered. and you'd see p
this militarization of u.s. foreign policy and, you know, is africom really just a guise to allow the u.s. military an entree into africa, and is that really what you're, you you know, what you're about there, is to get a presence on the continent? let me just say from a, just from a scale the state department and usaid is the principal entity of the government that spends money, spends last fiscal year between eight and nine billion, billion with a b, in africa. the department of defense spent a little more than $500 million. so there's a, i mean, there's just a dollar comparison in terms of what the level of effort is. overwhelmingly, the u.s. government's support to african countries falls into the categories of health care, education and agriculture. security is a very, very minor part of it. it's an important part, but it's a minor part of the u.s. overallen gaugement with african -- overall engagement with african countries, and i think that's probably as it should be. the defense strategic guidance which i referred to in my opening comments tells me from the president and the secretary of de
are subscribers and readers which we've carried out in collaboration with foreign policy and lots of other conferences and publications around south asian affairs. so anyway, we're all very pleased to have this occasion to bring us together, and the purpose today is to have a very serious discussion about the ideas and subjects that are in the book and that are, obviously, still alive as dilemmas for american foreign policy. so let me introduce peter and welcome him to the podium. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, steve, and thank you for all of you coming today and for c-span for covering this. steve was instrumental in making this whole project happen, so i'm very grateful to him. thank you, also, to oxford university press which published the book and did, i think, a fine job in terms of presenting the material. thank you, also, to my co-editor, katherine, and thanks also to people here at the foundation, brian fishman, patrick doherty, jennifer roland and andrew lev witch who were also involved in making the book possible. as steve indicated, the reason we felt this project was neces
are the most impressive and smartest of all our foreign policy thinkers. and so i made that comment not too long ago, and someone said how could that be? why would the military guys be smarter? i said, well, if for no other reason, the same reason secretary gates gave the speech that he gave out in kansas on a lecture or series two months ago when he devoted his speech to the congress and the united states putting more resources in the state department, more resources in diplomacy, more resources in soft power. because he understands as secretary of defense or anyone who wears the uniform is burden is now on our soldiers. and we have overloaded the circuits. of we've asked our military to damn near do everything. well, we should never, ever put the military in that position. not only are they not capable of doing everything, they can't. they're human. and so consequently, we're seeing a great deterioration in the quality of our army and the marines, we're doing great damage to our fort structure. and i talk about that in the book. but soft power, how do we use all the instruments of our gov
of foreign policy, but with an understanding of the nuanced approach necessary to effectively interact on a multinational scale. excuse me, stage. when vice president biden was chairman of the foreign relations committee, said on more than one occasion that good international relationships are always predicated on strong interpersonal relationships. john kerry understands that there is no substitute for strong interpersonal relationships, whether in the senate politics or international diplomacy. secretary of state is not a desk job and it requires constant personal interactions for american foreign policy. during his 30 years in public life and more than 25 years in the senate, senator kerry has championed many issues. earlier today the senate foreign relations committee favorably reported his nomination to the senate unanimously and presented senator kerry with an honorary resolution highlighting a few of his many accomplishments. among the accomplishments are the reforms with senator john mccain that led to an effort to investigate the fate of american soldiers unaccounted for in vi
of the foreign-policy choices facing this country. and today we are continuing what we have come to call secretary of state week here in the council. on tuesday night we were fortunate to hear from george shultz, who served as secretary of state for some six and a half years under president ronald reagan. and this afternoon we are honored to host hillary rodham clinton. during her last 24 hours as president obama's first president obama's first secretary of state and immediately afterwards and told she might be expected to party like it's cartagena all over again. [laughter] we did a research and this is the eighth time that hillary clinton has spoken at the council and her third appearance in and her current incarnation as secretary of state. this afternoon speech is probably the most anticipated one she has given here and indeed it may be the most anticipated farewell address since 1796. [laughter] i suspect though that her views on untangling alliances might be somewhat different than george washington's. much has been made of the mile she has put in as the country's 67 secretary of s
the understanding of the world of the foreign policy choices facing this country. today we are continuing what we have come to call secretary of state we cure the council. on tuesday night we were fortunate to hear from george shultz, who served as secretary of state for some six and a half years under president ronald reagan. and this afternoon we are honored to host hillary rodham clinton. during her last 24 hours as president obama's for secretary of state, immediately afterwards i'm told she might be expected to party like it's cartagena all over again. [laughter] we did our research and this is the eighth time that hillary clinton has spoken at the council and her third appearance in her current incarnation as secretary of state. and his afternoon speech is probably the most anticipated one she has given here and it may be the most anticipated farewell address since 1796. [laughter] i suspect though that her views on entangling alliances might be somewhat different than george washington's. much as been made of the mile she has put in as the country 67 secretary of state. you have seen a sta
-- and so you've had a lot to say about foreign policy. you've also had a thing or two to say about the republican position on taxes and a number of other issues. so i wonder, is your view that republicans need to get right on foreign policy and can that that is really a core issue that's affecting everything else, or do you see that fundamentally as a garnish on the salad, something maybe we ought to -- a nice to have, not an essential? >> you know, i think we need as a party to have -- i won't try to say his last name because i always butcher it myself -- i think we need john and bill need that wing of the party, but we also need realists that acted and thought and saw the world like we with did when we were in congress in the 1990s, when we controlled congress from '94 on where we believe inside a restrained foreign policy. .. as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with it. i think our bigger problem from the bush era came from the fact he's a big government republican. he came in with $155 billion surplus. when you left we had a tr
who work in foreign policy are drawn in. in the old days, this is not as embraced as it is now. for those of us who didn't study history, a lot of us remember that all of these inconsequential and rather uninteresting country is, whether it was czechoslovakia of the time or the molly of the time, they were the precursors to larger battles that could have been dealt with had they been dealt with early. i wonder thinking through that where we see things going and underscored the throat open and see who grabs at first. >> okay. well, let's just compare senator kerry and senator hagel to senator hillary clinton and bob gates. by that standard, both of the nominees -- they are not independent thinkers and they have no track record either legislating in the intellectual sense or advancing important ideas or on international politics. but the underlying cause is the president's lack of interest in these issues. >> yes, i have another part of this discussion. the republican party is now focused on trying to be responsible about what kind of physical environments we leave to our childre
to the conservative viewpoint, whether it be on foreign policy and anti communism, economic conservative as some, constitutionalism or what today is called social conservatism more likely than can -- traditional conservatism. the issues were different and less clear back then but there has always been social conservatism. rusher had an important ally named frank meyer remains sufficiently respected and known among at least an older generation of conservatives that there is a frank meyer society in washington which i am going to be a group of conservative leaders who keep his memory alive. they are going to be meeting monday night and i will be speaking to them. meyer has been described by rusher as the intellectual engine of the conservative movement. he too was an ex-communist as burnham was. but meyer was a conservative activist. a passion that conservative activists. rusher even told me that meyer had once been a militant communist. rusher had been a militant republican, quote, they are not all that far apart except in what they believe. what rusher meant by that was he had it tremendous attr
will judge them a little bit differently. i think the decisions that he has made on foreign policy with respect to the war on terror will be viewed as some point in the future as more courageous and less in that than they are currently. they're less favorable in the size of government not shrinking the government spending. the interests of cutting him, cutting spending, cutting the size of the government the congressman when we talk about this is a guy by the name of jeff who isn't very well known was a advocate of cutting the earmarks and john mccain is a good candidate with wide appeal and he wasn't conservative because he is pretty moderate on a lot of issues like on global warming legislation, immigration, so i think that in some ways -- thye support his immigration policy, so in some ways republicans need to return to the reagan years but they also need to be proactive and advocating policies that have independent appeal. islamic in our short discussion we talk about religion. what do you say to people that think republicans are fundamental christians that are out of touch in
to $100 trillion and that is a stunning number. we had a dysfunctional foreign policy, we had this problem of the baby boom generation. and we have a 12 from kindergarten education system. it is not too late. we have about that kind of timeframe in order to start moving. if we don't move soon, it becomes almost impossible to fix this without upheaval. i happen to actually be fairly optimistic. i do think two things. i think the american sense of life, americans fundamentally don't like big government. when times seem to be moving the wrong direction, sometimes we are surprised. i think this is a nice caviar. the biggest thing that we have going for us is that we have the best ideas. the bad news is that things have railed over and over again. people tell me how surprised they were when the soviet union failed. but communism always fails. it did not surprise me at all. the question is when it does, will we be there with the right ideas to move the country in the right direction. even though i think we will win because we have the right ideas. in regards to individual objects, i think we had
states foreign policy tries to dictate terms to places like bolivia, less than 1% of excess cocaine in bolivia with ends up in the united states. and yet the heavyhanded nature of u.s. policy, you would think this was some kind of flood coming from bolivia the way we dictate terms to that country. and so, now, imagine if the united nations and the audience of the u.n. convention were to treat coffee the way, with the contempt they treat coca, right? what would happen if they -- and they've told bolivians and peruvians you have to stop chewing coca which they've been doing for centuries, if not thousands of years. imagine if they did that to the united states, you know, coffee, you have to give up this habit now. what would happen? well, a friend of mine actually did this. he was a performance art major, andrew. he went to amherst college, and in 2001 he conspire with the the school administration and student government to secretly ban coffee or for one day without notice during finals week as a performance art project. so all these students get up in the morning, and there's no coff
a dysfunctional foreign policy, we have a big problem with demographics and the retirement of the baby boom generation as a non-trivial problem, and we have a field of case triple the educational system by any kind of economic stance. we have the potential for really bad times if we do not change direction. this is good news, it isn't too late because the skill exponential and about eight years but we have about that kind of time frame in order to start moving. if we don't move in the next four or five years it becomes almost impossible mathematically to fix a problem without some kind of a social real upheaval that wouldn't be fun i don't think to date i happen to be even with the recent election results i happen to be fairly optimistic, and i know that sounds strange. i do think there are two things. i think for the american sense of life is a protector to the degree that americans fundamentally in some level don't like big government. they don't like big government, and when times seem to be going the wrong direction and get positive surprises like we did in 2010 when the american pushba
in the constitution's direction on foreign policy. america's future foundation's online magazine double tank of us in professionals the opportunity to find their voice and am pleased to on the editor, georgia turkey. are you around? please network withdrawal if you have an idea. but that's a heavy right for us as well. we also invite you to a number of other networking and professional development events. learn more at america's or follow us on twitter at afs d.c. it is my honor to introduce our panel moderator this evening, maurice sanders. lori is the manager of the richer freedom project at the american presence of gibberish insert for the last three years. in this role she supports adis external affairs and student outreach teams as well as marketing and outreach for arthur brooks latest book, the road to freedom, which i highly recommend if you haven't had a chance to read. she's a member of the america's future foundation planning committee on which he asserts as 2010. the shyness and welcoming, laurie sanders. [applause] >> thanks, roger and welcome to the american enterprise ins
to the senate, i have been fortunate to be invited to his home for lengthy but fascinating foreign policy discussions with snoot colleagues on -- with senate colleagues and foreign policy experts. he was instrumental in securing passage of the new start treaty with russia. he served as an unofficial envoy to president obama to pakistan and some countries that probably none of us know where he went. there are many times he's come to me and said, i've got to go, and he tells me where he's going, thouing in the newspapers about -- nothing in the newspapers about where he'd gone. but he is a great evaluator of people, and because of that, the president trusts him and has sent him on all these missions. now he will do that as secretary of state. he's authored numerous pieces of legislation to prevent the global spread of h.i.v. aids. he also played a central role in crafting our policy in iraq and afghanistan in the war on traimpleterror. i can remember one time where he spent days and days with president karzai working 0en a difficult issue following the elections that they had there. he'he's
. and our foreign policy often makes no sense at all. and so i think we do need to reassess. we made this deal with mubarak. we didn't make this deal with morrissey. currently egypt is unraveling. i think it's a terrible mistake to send these weapons to egypt, and i hope my colleagues will consider that. thank you, madam president. i yield back high time and -- i yield back my time and suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: a senator: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. under the previous order, there will be two minutes of debate equally divided prior to a vote in relation to amendment number 6 offered by the senator from ohio, mr. portman. the senator from ohio. mr. portman: thank you, madam president. we had a good debate earlier on this. this is the dollar-for-dollar deficit-reduction act. it makes all the sense in the world. we have a $16 trillion national debt now exceeding $130,000 per household in america. we're told by
. as we all know, senator kerry has played a leading role in shaping american foreign policy for many years in his position on the foreign relations committee and as chair of that distinguished committee. as chair of that, he was instrumental in securing passage of the new start treaty, an arms control accord with russia that is helping to reduce the danger of nuclear proliferation. he has served as a trusted special envoy to afghanistan, sudan and pakistan at crucial moments. senator kerry advocated for democratic elections in the philippines. he was part of the delegation that uncovered the fraud that ultimately led to the removal of president ferdinand marcos. he was a strong proponent of u.s. action to end ethnic cleansing in kosovo and to impose sanctions on burma tied to human rights abuses. senator kerry has been a leader in promoting economic development and recovery in haiti, fighting global hiv-aids, supporting democracy and human dignity, and the advancement of human empowerment throughout the world. in his early days in the senate, senator kerry and i -- in fact, we were e
is jessica zuckerman, research associate in our center for foreign policy studies. she studies researches and writes on border security, counterterrorism, immigration reform, democratic institutions, and the rule of law. prior to joining us in 2009 she was assistant to heritage is visiting fellow matt mayer and helped him research for his book, homeland security and federalism, protecting america from outside the beltway. she received her masters of public administration with an emphasis in federal policy from george washington university. she holds a bachelor of arts degree in spanish and international relations from ohio state university. please join me in welcoming my college, jessica zuckerman. jessica. [applause] >> and two, john. and thank you all for joining us today. the real id program sprang from the recommendation of the national commission on terrorist attacks upon the united states, better known as the 9/11 commission. the commission found that 18 of the 9/11 hijackers had 30 ids between them, including six that were used on the morning of the attack. the commission called on
journal" in 2,000,008, amy has covered a variety of topics including foreign policy, national security letter clever to rising and the election of the new supreme court justice. prior to nj she was a staff writer for the reporters committee for freedom of the press. ireport from the automakers panel will include, and i would love you all to be able to hear these folks names as i introduce them. robert bienenfeld senior manager environment and energy strategy product regulatory office, american honda motor company incorporated. reg modlin director of regulatory affairs chrysler llc. tom stricker vice president predatory affairs in energy and environmental research, toyota motors north america incorporated and amy, if you would like to get started we will try to get the audience to quiet down. >> thank you for that great introduction. we have two out of three of our panelists so i guess that is the two-thirds majority so we will go ahead and get started. i think that was a great discussion with gina mccarthy and mary nichols and the other experts on that panel. i want to take the big pic
in 2008, amy has covered a variety of topics including foreign policy, national security, political advertising and the election of the new supreme court justice on nj's ninth justice blog. prior to nj, she was a staff rir writer for freedom of the press. our report from the automakers' panel will include -- and i'd love you all to be able to hear these folks' names as i introduce them -- great. robert bienenfeld, environment and energy strategy product regulatory office, american honda motor company incorporated. reg modlin, director regulatory affairs, chrysler llc. tom stricker, vice president of technical and regulatory affairs and energy and environmental research, toyota motors, north america incorporated. amy, if you can, if you'd like to get started, um, we'll try to get the audience to quiet down. >> well, thank you for that great introduction. we have two out of three of our panelists, so i guess that's a two-thirds majority, so i think we're going to go ahead and get started. i think that was a great discussion we just had with jeep that mccarthy, mary nichols and the oth
though the government had speakers at the press club and they had a policy of having the foreign dignitaries at the press club and so women who were assigned to cover these people were cooped up in this hot miserable balcony where they couldn't eat and here they could see the man on the floor having a nice lunch also they didn't have enough milk to but that was with the status of the women in those days there was a woman at the "washington post" i knew well who was taken off the prized civil-rights assignment at the post because the people that were involved in this civil rights protest were going to have meetings here at the press club and because women were not allowed in the press club they were complaining about this and said we will find a man for this. that's the way things work to the estimate was your beat the "washington post"? >> i have a variety of beads at the washington post. i covered the suburbs in the city of alexandria and covered the course general sessions that was now the superior court and i covered welfare and i covered education, the d.c. public schools. i
the senate foreign relations committee and the policies of this country. but most importantly of all, on those tough, tough issues, like the ratification of the new start treaty, secretary kerry -- now secretary kerry, then chairman kerry, made sure that every member of the committee, in the entire markup and hearing process, had their questioned answered, their concerns answered, and was a part of the process. he never tried to ramrod anything through the committee nor through the congress but, rather, did his job in an exemplary way. so it's a privilege for me to rise tonight to pay tribute to john kerry, the next secretary of state of the united states of america and commend him on his confirmation to that job. and i yield back and note the absence -- and i yield back. the presiding officer: the senate stands adjourned until senate stands adjourned until >> one can't count the times that americans favor the best country in the world. what a marvelously thing to say. of all the countries in the world, everybody thinks their countries pretty good. why do we have to believe that we a
assistance from foreign countries to finance our government's reckless fiscal policies." he goes on to say -- "over the past five years, our federal debt has increased by $3.5 trillion to $8.6 trillion. that is trillion with a t. that is money that we have borrowed from the social security trust fund, borrowed from china and japan, borrowed from the american taxpayers. with over -- and over the next five years between now and 2011, the president's budget will increase the debt by almost $3.5 trillion." continuing to quote from senator obama in 2006, "numbers that large are sometimes hard to understand. some people may wonder why they matter. here is why. this year, the federal government will spend $220 billion on interest. that is more money to pay interest on our national debt than we'll spend on medicaid and the state children's health insurance program. that is more money than we pay interest on our debt this year than we will spend on education, homeland security, transportation and veterans' benefits combined. it's more in one year than we're likely to spend to rebuild the devastat
in the u.s. foreign policy and that the u.s. officials will favor peace instead of warmongering." the iranians are claiming that we're the ones warmongering while they are building a nuclear weapon. just for good measure, thal jazeera web site wrote an article "obama defeats the lobby." is this the impression we want to give our applies to the middle east? is this how we encourage our friends to say we will be there to support our allies? is this the message we want to convey to our adversaries like iran who has threatened the annihilation of israel to wipe it off the map? unfortunately, that's the message that's conveyed by a nomination of senator hagel as secretary of defense. not only is senator hagel been a persistent critic of iran's sanctions, he's also displayed a stubborn hostility to america's closest middle eastern ally. in october 2000 shortly after yasser arafat launch a second intifada, 96 u.s. senators signed a letter to president clinton affirming their solidarity with israel. senator hagel was not among th them. six months later, after a relentless onslaught of p
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)